Tuesday, 15 July 2014

Bolton Museum makes bid for £1.8m Egyptology wing

From my latest article for The Art Newspaper

The Bolton Museum in northern England is planning a £1.8m Egyptology wing that will include a life-size facsimile of the burial chamber of King Tuthmosis III. Awarded £115,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 2012 to update their Egyptian galleries, the museum is now planning to make a bid for a second lottery grant that would allow it to build an entirely new display area above the current museum and library, dedicated to the art and culture of ancient Egypt.

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Tuesday, 17 June 2014

I've been Interviewed

I've been interviewed by the online journal Egyptological. To read about my thoughts on Egyptian Mythology, and my upcoming projects, check out the following link: An Interview with Dr Garry Shaw

Thursday, 5 June 2014

Egypt tracks down suspected looted works to Europe

From my latest article for The Art Newspaper

Five ancient Egyptian artefacts, allegedly stolen from the same tomb in south Saqqara sometime during the past 13 years, have been located in Budapest and Paris, reports Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities.

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Thursday, 22 May 2014

Egyptian artefacts recovered after looting, now on show in Cairo

From my latest article for The Art Newspaper.

Around 200 stolen artefacts, recovered since Egypt’s 2011 revolution, are now on show at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo in an exhibition that runs for three months. Most of the objects were recovered abroad, while some 60 were seized in Egypt before they could leave the country.

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Wednesday, 30 April 2014

The Egyptian Myths: The Video

As with The Pharaoh, Thames and Hudson have produced a rather lovely video of me talking about The Egyptian Myths, covering different sections of the book. Enjoy!

 

A mummy family reunion

From my latest article for The Art Newspaper.

A cache of at least 50 royal mummies has been discovered in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor by a joint Swiss-Egyptian team. Inscriptions written on storage jars revealed the names of around 30 of the tomb’s occupants, including eight previously unknown princesses and four princes, all related to the pharaohs Tuthmosis IV and Amenhotep III, who ruled in the 14th century BC. The human remains, which were found spread across four of the tomb’s five chambers, included infants and newborns.

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Controversial security walls help protect Egypt’s antiquities

From my latest article for The Art Newspaper.

As looting continues at archaeological sites across Egypt, controversial security walls built in Cairo before the 2011 revolution have helped to protect vulnerable sites. In recent months, the archaeological site of Deir el-Ballas, about 40km north of Luxor, has been damaged by looters and encroachment, reports Peter Lacovara, a senior curator at the Michael C. Carlos Museum in Atlanta who excavated the site in the 1980s and recently revisited the area.

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